Category Archives: Healthcare Policy

And the Texas Board of Nursing Strikes Back

On May 18th, the Texas Board of Nursing will publish proposed changes (after the jump) to section 213.26 of the Texas Administrative Code. The changes, if approved in their entirety, will essentially neuter the State Office of Administrative Hearings and render formal hearings before SOAH almost superfluous by removing the ability of the Administrative Law…

Medicaid Changes Don’t Bode Well for Healthcare System

The New York Times has been reporting extensively on the crisis in Medicaid.  On Wednesday, Robert Pear reported on the growing storm.  Money quote: To hold down costs, states are cutting Medicaid payments to doctors and hospitals, limiting benefits for Medicaid recipients, reducing the scope of covered services, requiring beneficiaries to pay larger co-payments and…

Hospice Care Not Coorelated With Earlier Death

At least in Korea, as reported by Reuters.  Korean medical researchers looked at patients with terminal cancer diagnoses and placed them in two groups – those that received hospice care for palliative care and those that received a full range of medical care.  After controlling for other factors, there was no statistical difference in the…

No Surprises Here: Lack of Trauma Care in Rural, Poor Areas

In the Archives of Surgery, published online January 17th.  The story, reprinted after the jump, is from the Reuters report published January 19th.  And this is not a situation that I believe will be changing in the near future based on the current political and economic climate. Marc Source:  Possible Geographical Barriers to Trauma Center…

Honoring end of life wishes – Engage with Grace

Sometimes we become aware of things because of a plan.  Sometimes we become aware of things because of happenstance.  In this case, the latter is true, as the bulk of this post is part of a movement to have us communicate our end of life wishes to our loved ones.  In the professional world I…

Institue of Medicine Report on Nursing and Healthcare Leadership Highlighted in New York Times Article

Pauline Chen, MD, a contributor to the New York Times Well blog, has published an article in yesterday’s New York Times highlighting a recent report from the Institute of Medicine that promotes the idea that nurses should be included in the current debate of healthcare reform as leaders in the movement towards healthcare reform.  I…

Report: California Nurse Ratio Standards Decrease Mortality, Increase Nurses Job Satisfaction

A recent study published online in the journal Health Services Research has indicated that hospitals that meet the standards set forth by the State of California in mandating nurse/patient ratios have decreased mortality rates and burnout rates among nurses and increased levels of job satisfaction amongst nurses.  The study (link here), lead by Linda Aiken…

Mayo Clinic and the problems with primary care

This blog is primarily aimed at nurses in Texas, but if there are elements of the national health-care debate that pop up, I want to highlight those issues, too.  This post, on The New Republic’s The Treatment blog, presents one of the biggest problems in health-care – that low reimbursement rates for primary care ,…

HHS lauds 27 Texas Hospitals for Organ Donation Rates

The US Department of Health and Human Services recently released a list of hospitals nationally that had high rates of organ donation.  27 Texas Hospitals were on the list, including 8 in the Houston area. The top honor, gold medal status, was earned by Cook Children’s Medical Center in Fort Worth.  Cook Children’s was one…

Blowback from Tort Reform: more complaints to the state licensing board?

Taralyn Mackay, in her blog “A Nurse Attorney’s Thoughts,” reports on this gem from the National Council of State Boards of Nursing regarding the impact of tort reform on nurses (and other healthcare providers, presumably):